FIFA presidential candidates: Who’re they and what do they provide?

With FIFA’s presidential election one month away, Gabriele Marcotti provides an overview of the five candidates.

Name: Prince Ali bin Al Hussein
Nationality: Jordanian
Age: 40
Background: Son on the former King of Jordan, who died in 1999, and half-brother in the current King. President with the Jordan Football Association.
Highest workplace held in football: Vice president of FIFA representing Asia (2011 to 2015).
Exciting fact: He was a paratrooper inside the Jordanian army together with president of Jordan’s film commission.
Most significant promoting points: He received much more than a third from the votes when he ran against Sepp Blatter last year, he’s been quite open and forthright with his manifesto and he’s entirely untouched by scandal.
Weak spot: He’s only 40 and you can not help but feel that he got numerous of his jobs by virtue of who his dad is. 4 years as a FIFA vice president isn’t an extensive resume either.
Very best thought: He’ll publish the Garcia report in complete and make FIFA much more transparent.
Exactly where he stands on expanding the Globe Cup: He’s in favour.
Manifesto: “My Vision for FIFA and Football”

Name: Jerome Champagne
Nationality: French
Age: 57
Background: A former French diplomat, he moved into football functioning around the 1998 Planet Cup and spent 11 years functioning at FIFA below Sepp Blatter.
Highest office held in football: FIFA director of international relations.
Fun reality: His candidacy has been endorsed by both Pele and Robbie Keane.
Biggest selling points: His diplomatic background has been instrumental in assisting him take on difficult diplomatic circumstances, for example the partnership between the Israeli and Palestinian football associations as well as the Kosovo FA’s quest for FIFA recognition. He is also pretty close to many African FAs.
Weak spot: These 11 years operating for Blatter don’t assist in the eyes of some (while, conversely, they may be important to other folks). Has failed to have a great deal traction together with the media.
Finest idea: He desires to introduce global collective bargaining for all skilled footballers, and also giving seats around the Executive Committee to FIFPro and representatives of leagues and clubs.
Exactly where he stands on expanding the Globe Cup: He’s against it (in actual fact, he thinks it really is currently difficult to organise one with 32 teams).
Manifesto: “My Agenda for the 21st-Century FIFA”